HHO, Hydrogen, and Alt Energy News

The Pro Series EFIE/MAF Tuner for HHO kits

One of our readers, John, suggested I write more on the Pro Series tuners and where to start when using them. That was the plan already- thanks John! In fact, we will be putting new series of videos together covering the installation of our hho kits, the setup, tweaking, and troubleshooting as well as installation of the efies! I will send out emails to our private list and subscribers as those are uploaded- so make sure and subscribe!

The Pro Series Tuners

Along with our advanced EFIE/MAF tuners which essentially cover the MAF or MAP sensors and anywhere from 1-4 O2 sensors (see more about those on previous articles linked below), we also offer a more advanced tuner called the Pro Series (gasoline only). If you havent read the previous articles- please catch up with part 1 and 2 on links below:

PART 1: http://www.hhokitsdirect.com/blogs/news/36121921-what-is-an-efie-and-do-i-need-one-with-my-hho-kit
PART 2: http://www.hhokitsdirect.com/blogs/news/37332289-what-is-an-efie-and-do-i-need-one-with-my-hho-kit-part-2

The Pro Series is more advanced and is designed for the newer vehicles with more sensors and more computer controls. The old OBD1 systems (pre-1996 cars) was very simple and had 1 maybe 2, O2 sensors, and/ or a MAF. As cars progressed, the fuel maps and computer controls did too. By 2005-2006, mfgs started using additional sensors, and by 2010 -2012, it seems most started using the additional sensors. 

I am referring to the addition of both the IAT (Intake Air Temp) and the CTS (Coolant Temp Sensor). The first one is usually tied in in the same wiring harness as the MAF and measures the air temp coming into engine.The second one measures the temperature of the coolant. Both in more modern engines are used to determine fuel maps, and ultimately how much fuel to deliver to the engine.

HOW DOES THE PRO SERIES HELP?

If the engine computer determines the air (using the IAT) is say 120 degrees F, it is programmed to LEAN out the fuel. If it is 35 degrees F, it is going to richen up, or add more fuel. When we adjust the pot on the Pro Series, we are telling the ECM that the outside air is Hotter than it actually is- so the ecm chooses the leaner fuel map. Now, mind you, the engine is not harmed in anyway. The computer just thinks it is hotter outside, then it really it is, so its time to cut back the fuel. We NEVER do this without adding in an alternative fuel, such as our HHO kit, or you run the risk of burning valves, but WITH the addition of HHO gas, the engine cuts back fuel, you add it back in with HHO, and the result is less gasoline burned, while maintaining power and gaining mileage (since you are extracting the fuel from water to compensate).

Same goes with the CTS. If the ECM thinks the engine coolant is say, 5-7 degrees hotter than it should be, it signals a leaner fuel map to lean out the gas and cool the engine back down. Remember, we are NOT actually making the engine hotter, we are making the computer "think" the engine is hotter to lean out fuel.

It really is the same thing with the O2 sensors and MAF. We lower the millivot signal of the O2 sensor so the engine thinks it is running too rich, and the computer chooses a leaner map.

Remember, never use these type of product without injecting hho or you could damage your engine. But when used with a quality HHO kit like we manufacture (shameless plug), they can give you more power, more mileage and lower your emissions for a long time. 

 

 

 

What is An EFIE and Do I Need One With My HHO Kit- Part 2

In Part 1, we talked about the basics of fuel injection, how they work and why you need an EFIE or Diesel chip with an HHO kit on a modern car.

We talked about how injectors are controlled by the cars computer (ECM) to determine how long they stay open or closed, and how fast they open or close. The ECM decides those parameters using a programmed set of "fuel maps", that utilize the information from the cars sensors to determine if the engine needs more gas or less gas. 

How Do EFIE's Affect the Fuel Injectors with an HHO kit Working?

Computers can only do what they are programmed for. They can't tell if you are going up a hill or towing a trailer, or anything else, without reading the information from the sensors first. The two key sensors are the O2 sensors in the exhaust to monitor oxygen levels, and the MAF or MAP sensors that monitor the flow of incoming air and the manifold vacuum.

The sensors transmit the data to the cars ECM using very tiny millivolt signals. An O2 sensor may be in the 400 millivolt range for example. When you install one of our EFIE's, you use a volt meter to adjust that millivolt rating down to say 300 millivolts. By doing this, you are telling the car computer to "Lean Out" the fuel, which allows the HHO generator to supply the additional energy, and still save fuel (If you do this without adding an alternative fuel, you will notice a lack of power, and could even burn your valves, so ONLY do this when injecting a new fuel like HHO gas). AN efie gas tuner allows you to slowly tweak and test to get the optimum performance from your hho generator.

The MAF sensor works on the same premise, but measures the mass air flow going into the engine to determine the work the engine is doing (engine load). When you use our EFIE or Diesel Chip, you adjust them to reduce the engine load setting. In other words, you are telling the car computer that it has a 20% lighter engine load than it actually is (for example). The computer then reduces fuel because of that. 

It is not as complicated as it may seem at first. You simply locate the one signal wire on a sensor and connect it to our EFIE or Diesel Chip, then adjust it with a screwdriver. After that, you never mess with it again. (we show you how to locate the wire, install it and adjust it in our free manual). 

By changing the signals ever so slightly, you are teaching the car computer how to reduce the gas or diesel usage, when supplemented by pure hydrogen and oxygen gas. That is the Long term way to make your hho kit function as both an emission reducer and fuel saver, without loss of power or performance.

Stay tuned for Part 3 where we get into the Pro series level chips and how they differ from our advanced series.

If you have any questions- feel free to email us!

Until next time,
Bob

 

What is An EFIE and Do I Need One With My HHO Kit?

This question is one of the most argued points when it comes to HHO generator kits on vehicles, so I thought it would be a good idea to go ahead and address the issue.

What Is An EFIE?

An EFIE stands for Electronic Fuel Injection Enhancer, and it was really invented back many years ago by a man named George Wiseman, who then shared it with the world to use as necessary to help cars with fuel injection work well with HHO boosters. The file was quickly shared all over the internet and became the standard for most EFIE's still in use today, though they have been vastly improved, and operate smarter (like in our advanced EFIE designs).

Why Are They Needed?

The tuner circuits were invented as a response to the advancement in car computer enhancement, and the advent of throttle body Injection (TBI), and Fuel Injection Rails to inject metered amounts of fuel into a cars engine. They solved a huge amount of problems that commonly occurred with carburetors, such as hard starting, vapor lock, stalling, rough idle, etc. 

The fuel injector contains a small valve that opens and closes rapidly to allow a fast, fine mist of gasoline or diesel to be injected into the combustion chamber of the engine at the perfect time, in the perfect amount, based on the circumstances of the car engine (ie: the car may be idling, accelerating, decelerating, going uphill, towing a trailer, etc), and each circumstance requires a different response from the injectors to vary the fuel properly. The programming used to determine these conditions is put together in a series of "Fuel Maps", that have pre-designated timing sequences for the injectors.

What Does This Have To Do With An EFIE?

The injectors are actually an incredible invention. Think of them as a miniature high pressure spray gun, that not only opens and closes in micro seconds, but with the computer programming, they are told to pulse faster or slower, and stay open faster or slower depending.

So what determines their pulse rate and timing? The computer programming. But how does the computer know what to tell the injectors? Only ONE way...through the engine sensors. The computer has No Other Way of knowing the condition of the engine. Without the sensors, it would be like a blind man trying to run a race in a country he had never been, having no idea what is around the next corner. 

THAT is where the EFIE comes into play!

Stay tuned for Part Two where I will get into the sensors of the engine that control, and how the EFIE affects them, and why they are necessary for long term gains when using an HHO kit